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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 84 (some duplicates have been removed)
a healthcare problem and political one. >> bret: bipartisan group of senators and president obama have outline of immigration reform legislation this week. senior political analyst brit hume is here with his analysis of what is right with one of them. why have so many immigrant families from asia done so well in this country? one reason they had to come a long way to get here. it's still a formidable obstacle and screens out the less able and determined. relatively small subset of the population, 6%, nearly half of whom have a bachelor degree. they are in short the people this country needs. this is why one of the most useful part of the immigration reform package rolled out the other day to award green cards to immigrants who old advance degrees in science, technology, engineering and math. we need 120,000 computer engineering jobs a year and we graduate a third of those and many of those leaf the country because the visa expires. 55,000 green cards were awarded bay brandon draw each year to immigrants from countries who previously sent few people to the u.s.. not surprisingly it's known as t
the region will be a political and economic and military chaos. lou: president obama has said that a decade of war is near its end. peace is at hand, i guess. is that a prospective you share? >> no, that was never true. it was not true when he said it last year, and it's not true today. these wars are continuing. it simply means that we are not in the fight or not helping shape the outcome. the outcomes matter, whether in afghanistan, syria today than. our interests are at stake. there are ways in which we can help shape these outcomes favorably tell us into our friends and allies in the region without committing tens of thousands of ground troops. that is a strong man. he has assembled. so, again, it has to do with the strategy of foreign-policy. instead of seeing every issue as a transaction to move from your in box tiara box, this administration has a hard time understanding this week that is taking place across the arab world in developing a comprehensive response to it. lou: thank you for being with us. we appreciated. thank you. thank you both. up next, it turns out that president bus
of love between the best friends forever. >> no political tea leaves? >> we haven't got some tea. >> if he had a clinton presidency, i think we would have fixed this fiscal mess. >> it seems to be the pr organization for the obama administration. >> male models moonlighting as handymen. >> mike wallace is spinning in his grave. >> let's get to our panel now, angela rye is a political strategist. dr. james peterson is a contributor to thegrio.com and ryan grim, d.c. bureau chief for "the huffington post." welcome to all of you. i'm glad you're watching again ryan behind you on the screen. professor peterson, we saw a lot of the president this weekend, a lengthy interview given to the new republic and that interview with hillary clinton on "60 minutes." i see republicans grumbling about that interview. is that because it made democrats seem like mature, well-mannered, adults who are trying to get something done? >> yeah. for all of their critique about what they perceived as being a softball interview, have you ever seen a republican politician on a fox news interview? certainly there's a do
, that can backfire. this is obama/biden politics going forward now. going outside of washington to try to change public opinion and remake how people think about issues. gun control, as i said, biggest effort ever to try to change the gun control laws. doesn't mean it's going to work, but the president and the vice president are going to try. >> senator feinstein said it well, it's an uphill road. will the administration lower its expectations? you know, maybe concentrate on the background checks and not so much the assault weapon ban? >> the background checks are enormously popular and clearly have a better chance of passage. what it seems based on what vice president biden emphasized yesterday and what some on capitol hill are saying, better to get the so-called low-hanging fruit. better to go for the measures that could build some popularity. and maybe some momentum. pass those and then maybe come back. the president feels passionately about this issue. any parent can look at his face when he talks about newtown and know for him it's personal, and it's important. and the best way to
right now, the work that is being done in democratic politics right now, led by president obama at the start of his second term is this effort to turn what has been long-standing majority support for liberal policies into appreciation that those policies aren't just individual free-floating tech no ratically good ideas that we agree on, those policies come from a worldview and a problem-solving approach that is in fact the governing philosophy of this country. we're a liberal country. we are not a center-right country the way the right always wants to tell us. we are a country where liberal policies are widely popular and, frankly, at the national level we express that right now by mostly voting for democrats. by a lot. that's the portrait of the country that the president was painting this week in his second inaugural, in tying this list of what get described as liberal policies to fundamental centrist, widely acknowledged, basically universal american values. >> we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with
. [applause] [applause] california was the first in the nation to pass laws to implement president obama's historic political career at. health benefit exchange called cover california will begin next year perverting assurance to nearly 1 million californians. with the rest this decade, california will steadily reduce the number of uninsured. today a call for a special session to do with those issues that must be decided quickly if california is to get the affordable care act started by next january. broader expansion of medi-cal is incredibly complex that will take more time. working out the right relationship of counties will test our ingenuity and not be achieved overnight. given the cost involved, great prudence should guide every step of the way. california lost 1.3 million jobs in the great recession, overcoming back at a faster pace than the national average. the nuance of business and economic development, gove is, one of the good bills -- [laughter] directly assisting more than 5000 companies this past year. one of those who stand some connectors headquartered in korea were tuba
helped by her time out of the political spotlight really. so it's a good thing for president obama. it allows the two of them to come together and make that argument as she made that they're really above politics here. >> morris, no matter what she does there's going to be speculation about what does this mean for 2016. do you read anything into this joint interview having to do with her possibility of running a few years down the road? >> yeah. for sure. >> t.j., i just feel good when i see a unified strong democratic party. it makes democrats feel good. we know we don't always have the situation. as my friend susan knows. but this is a strong message that this is a job well done. it's a shift going into governing. there will be another shift between obama and clinton when she starts to run for president. so this is just the appropriate way to handle it. it feels very good as a democrat to see them together. >> what about joe though, morris? what about joe? what if he decides to get into the race in 2016? >> i think they'll find something else to do in 2016. >> all right. well sus
there will be the emphasis on the enforcement side, but i think that obama will spend some political capital on the issue of how these 11 million undocumented aliens can become on the path to citizenship. >> and as someone who kns that process, who knows the complicated paperwork, who knows the frustration of waiting for the bureaucracy, do you think it can be done, you can have a path to earned citizenship, which somebody comes forward, gets first a green card, legal status and then in line for citizenship. can that be done in a way that is fair or as fair as possible in the sense that if there is someone who has been waiting legally, will the people already in this country actually go to the back of the line? that's what a lot of people suspect won't happen. >> well, the senate proposal and president obama have both said they will go to the back of the line. that line in some instances is years long for family reunification. it is one of the reasons that employers have said over and over that we need a simplified streamlined immigration system so that persons can be hired legally. and have a legal path
and obama administration for political reasons they have not wanted to release that regulation. so he has gone to nonprofits to digitize the vital record, make that accessible to driver's license issuing agencies and any other agency that needs it. it is the one piece of real id that has not hooked in well and the states have complained is a cost issue and i would love to hear the response to that issue of the cost review, and to the 9/11 commission side of it, checking begins that side, the birth certificate is one of the most vital things you can do. and it has been a tremendous job in digitizing those records. they have been tremendous. would have been the issues with the state in terms of not implementing that piece of real id. >> i will give you a delaware perspective of the sand was alluded to before. it was extremely complicated. a no number of jurisdictions, there are so many different levels of technology involved in 14,000 different birth certificates and in delaware we are just getting moving on the delaware records. it has been a long process in the state of delaware, it has b
of $250. adt. always there. >>> real politics now. as expected president obama called on congress to overhaul broken immigration laws. in a speech he praised a plan unveiled by eight senators. he stressed the similarities between his vision and theirs. >> that's what comprehensive immigration looks like, smarter enforcement, a pathway to earn citizenship, improvements in the legal immigration system, so that we continue to be a magnet for the best and the brightest all around the world. >> president obama also sounded a warning, though, saying the time to act is now, and if congress can't deliver, he's going to step in. >> the foundation for bipartisan action is already in place. and if congress is unable to move forward in a timely fashion, i will send up a bill based on my proposal and insist that they vote on it right away. >> bipartisan plan he's talking about comes with some crucial strings that contains provisions for paths to citizenship but only if certain conditions are first met. chief among those making sure the border is secure before any legislative action can take pl
are covering the interview that has everybody talking. president obama's joint sit-down with outgoing secretary of state hillary clinton. was it his official nod for her potential 2016 run? >> there's no political tea leaves to be read here? >> we don't have any tea. we've got some water here, the best i can tell. but, you know, this has been just the most extraordinary honor. >> is this payback for, let's say, bill clinton? doing such a great job for the obama campaign? >> it would have covered up the awkward fact that they're setting her up for, you know, a presidential run if they broke some news. >> i love joe biden. i think he's earned a shot at it. but if hillary clinton wants to run how do you stand in the way of history? >> joining me now is msnbc and nbc latino contributor, victoria soto. fellow at the university of texas. great to have you here in person. let's jump in to explain to everybody the bipartisan framework. there are eight different sections. let's go over the first four. contingent on securing border and combatting visa oversay, increase surveillance equipment and agents a
rifle association. people flagrantly brandishing their second amendment rights at political events, specifically gun toting events for president obama, showing up in campaign events in new hampshire and elsewhere, with their guns on display. and it was the gun rights groups trying to out do the nra with more inflammatory retroactive, today, wayne lapierre and the nra were determined not to allow any gun rights fanatics to sound crazier than wayne lapierre. joining me now, msnbc's krystal ball, and krystal, it seems to me that the tea party has had its effect on the nra, nudging them even further into the crazy season. >> yes, it seems to be. the nra is an elitist group, sending out the anecdotes, what you heard gail trotter remark about, they questions their membership that obama and the democrats want to come for their guns. and that has worked for a long time. but what we're seeing now, i think what we're seeing today is the death of a caricature, that stuff worked for so long. but what are we talking about? assault weapons ban, background checks for everyone. all of that makes r
of political decisions that had been made prior to the obama administration, but also because of the economic crisis and the feeling that somehow america had caused this, and so part of the responsibility i had was to go out, fly the flag, restore that confidence, make it clear that our leadership was intact, to set the table for the pivot to asia, to dealing with the arab revolution, to restoring really close relationships with our partners in europe, looking to enhance the neighborhood in latin america, and on so many issues, whether it was putting together international coalitions with iran and north korea, figuring out what to do with libya that would bring an unprecedented coalition between arab and nato countries, or whether it was just looking down the road at how we were doing diplomacy and introducing new tools into that mix, it was a very different time than ten, 20, 30, 40 years ago. i've kidded our mutual friend, henry kissinger, think how impossible it would have been for him to sneak off to china in the age of cell phones, twitter, facebook, everything else. it is a time that is
, in politics and in democracy, sometimes you win elections, sometimes you lose elections. i worked very hard. but i lost and then president obama asked me to be secretary of state. and i said yes. >> geraldo: what do you figure, bill kristol -- that appearance as president obama tilting toward hillary in 2016? or just thanking her for her hard work on behalf of his administration? >> i think tharching her, it's nice to see them, you know, tig the bow on four years of working together. but look, the cold judgment's going to be about whether the foreign and international security policies have worked. what the withdrawal from afghanistan is going to mean. how things are going in north africa, cuts in the defense budget. women in combat. the president's doing a lot in the foreign defense policy. in his first term, he was more moderate, he stayed in the center, he kept bob gates and general petraeus and leon panet a. now he has a doveish agend a. hillary clinton he was more hawkish than john kerry will be. i am worried personally for four years of the new obama team in national security. >> repo
. is hillary clinton the new barack obama in the eyes of the national media? that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. as you may know, i spend a lot of time analyzing media coverage of the political scene in this country. i do that because what the media reports shapes public opinion. and gives president obama, for example, a strong advantage in the national debate. not since john kennedy has the president received such soft coverage by the national press. and now they're even admitting it. >> the presence of obama even on the press corps. even on the people start behaving in ways juvenile and am murrish. >> of course you don't. >> i do. totally. >> oh man, indeed. it is widely believed that hillary clinton will run for president after mr. obama leaves office in 2016. it is also believed in conservative circles that mrs. clinton will receive very favorable press coverage. this week, she testified in front of congress about the massive screwup in libya that led to the assassination of ambassador christopher stephens and three other americans. now, you would think
media and the sound bites that come out of it? >> it's actually as totally revolutionized political communication. we saw it both in the success of the obama campaign in the fund raising arena and seen it in the ability of people to galvanize around a particular issue. that's what's so important about all of these things, the twitter and facebook. we use it extensively and it's a huge force. >> congressman yarmuth, thanks so much for taking the time. >> thank you, chris. >> as we watch gabby giffords continuing to come in. there is this level of emotion here. and really newtown took it to a level i don't think we've seen before. the parents have a piece in the "washington post," our country needs a new dialogue, one that doesn't follow the tired script of political squabbling. any improvement of our laws should not be decried as an attempt to take away rights. even those who lost the most are suggesting no such thing. >> do we need to see gabby giffords coming in and reminder of these 20 kids? >> apparently we do. there is a strong gun lobby and they oppose these things strongly. >>
sort of reached over, and i thought that she touched president obama on the wrist the way you might casually do with a friend. so i don't think that they're frenemies. it seems they had genuine affection for each other as they talked about politics, as they talked about their rivalry, yes, and also 2016. >> i consider hillary a strong friend. >> i mean, very warm, close. i think there's a sense of understanding that sometimes doesn't even take words because we have similar views. >> reporter: rewind five years to their bruising primary battle. >> you're likable enough, hillary. >> thank you so much. i'm here. he's not. >> i can't tell who i'm against sometimes. >> how long did it take to get over that? >> it didn't take long as people perceive it. >> it took longer for their staffs. not to mention -- >> i think spouses take it much harder. in a way -- >> reporter: 2016 came up. the president laughed off a question about endorsing clinton. >> and i was literally inaugurated four days ago. and you're talking about elections four years from now. >> reporter: and the secretary side-step
to preserve a program that is politically sustainable. that is pretty much what we thought we did. that is the dialogue we have with the incoming obama administration. i began my longest conversation with them at the agency, something along the lines of i think we have already done what you have done. it is appropriate in the new circumstances. it did not hold. all american detainees under any agent of the american government have to be treated with the army field manual. it was proved in september 2006. i would suggest the casual manual was written with the knowledge that there was option b. that this program was also available. now we are left with this option a. it should not concern you. before you get to interrogation, you have to capture and we do not capture. we have made it so legally difficult and so politically dangerous to capture that it seems to the outside looking in that the default option is to take the terrorists off the battlefield in another way. >> could you talk a bit about what obama inherited? we had moderate sleep deprivation. tummy slap. a diet of liquid e
been identified. and the morning you see the obama administration interested in action rather than politics, you're going to have a different kind of tone. but we also should be looking at two things. what are the psychiatric problems and to what degree does the federal privacy law make it almost impossible to identify people who have psychological problems? i suspect we're going to find this tragic situation in alabama right this minute involves somebody with a deep psychological problem. and then, second, i think we have to look at, what is happening in big cities, where it is, in fact, largely pistols that are involved, and largely gangs that are involved? >> let me ask you about another big issue that we've been talking about a lot this week, the issue of immigration. there's been a big bipartisan push, you know, this week, including republicans, marco rubio, john mccain, talking about this comprehensive immigration reform. but, clearly, not all republicans are on board with this latest push. listen here to senator david vitter. >> i love and respect marco. i think he's just am
at closing here. i think if the obama administration wants to accomplish something, i think they've -- >> hold on. let me interrupt you there. it isn't just political. because the polls, we just did a poll here at cnn. americans. 92% say there should be background checks in gun stores. 87% on gun shows. the first three words of the constitution are we the people. that comes before, the second, i don't understand. >> so, because it comes chronologically before shall not enfringe, it's more powerful. >> the people want this. so how is he being political -- >> public opinion has been wrong before. by the way, i don't think that we should -- >> matt, even your own leaders i think disagree with your position. even your own readers want -- >> my readers are to the right of atila the hun. my readers want -- my readers want guns. mandatory. that's what my readers want. obama -- this is something he can try to push through and if republicans don't vote for it, they'll look evil and horrible like wayne lapierre against gabby giffords. >> they're going against the will of the majority of th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 84 (some duplicates have been removed)